Moldavite

Moldavite

At first this crystal was thought to be a type of Obsidian.  Then it was thought to be fake.  In 1900, Dr. Suess (not the children's author) questioned the the little pit-sized holes and the wrinkles on even the smallest pieces of Moldavite.  How was it possible that these little pittings and wrinkles were caused by water?  Suess compared the markings to those found on meteorites and asserted that the crystal must be cosmic.  He proposed the name Tektite.  Stuky of Tektite revealed that it contained almost no water in its composition and didn't fuse easily, so it was generally accepted that the Tektites were remnants of an enormous meteroite that must have collided with the Earth about 15 milions years ago, in Western Bavaria.  The meteorite's impact sent lots of little melting chunks and bits flying through the air, cooling as they traveled and landed in The Czech Republic (then central Bohemia) where the Vitava River runs,  which is known as the river Moldau in German, whereby Moldavite received its current name.